Cosmos: La belleza del espacio

Osiris maldice a quien lee y no comenta òÓ!

Estas imágenes me han sobrecogido. Te hacen pensar...

Se trata del top ten de la NASA hasta la fecha, votadas por los propios internautas en la página web de la propia NASA.

Dejo los comentarios en inglés porque las imágenes ya dicen bastante, el que tenga un poco de interés los comprenderá sin problemas. También podéis pulsar en las imágenes para verlas en su tamaño original pero ¡0j0!, que alguna llega a pesar bastante (una en concreto unos 60Mb).

La belleza del espacio...



Comet NEAT
Date: 05.07.2004
This image of Comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) was taken at the WIYN 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, AZ, on May 7, 2004.

The image was taken with the Mosaic I camera, which has a one-square degree field of view, or about five times the size of the Moon. Even with this large field, only the comet's coma and the inner portion of its tail are visible. This color image was assembled by combining images taken through blue, green and red filters.

A small star cluster (C0736-105, or Melotte 72) is visible in the lower right of the image, between the head of the comet and the bright red star in the lower-right corner.

Comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) was discovered on August 24, 2001, by the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) system operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA.

Image Credit: T. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage), Z. Levay and L.Frattare (Space Telescope Science Institute) and National Optical Astronomy Observatory/Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy/National Science Foundation





Mars Over Moon
Date: 07.18.2003

Ron Wayman of Tampa, Fla., captured this crisp picture of Mars emerging from behind the Moon with an 8-inch telescope and a digital camera. Mars was briefly occulted - hidden from view - by Earth's Moon early on July 17, 2003.

Image Credit/Copyright: Ron Wayman, Tampa, Fla.





Full-Disk Neptune
Date: 08.20.1989
This picture of Neptune was produced from the last whole planet images taken through the green and orange filters on the Voyager 2 narrow angle camera. The images were taken at a range of 4.4 million miles from the planet, 4 days and 20 hours before closest approach.

The picture shows the Great Dark Spot and its companion bright smudge; on the west limb the fast moving bright feature called Scooter and the little dark spot are visible. These clouds were seen to persist for as long as Voyager's cameras could resolve them. North of these, a bright cloud band similar to the south polar streak may be seen.

Image Credit: NASA





Cassini Launch
Date: 10.15.1997
A long-exposure shows the Cassini spacecraft - carrying Europe's Huygens probe - streaking through the early morning sky over the Cape Canaveral Air Station, with the help of the Titan IVB/Centaur launch vehicle. The successful launch at 4:43 a.m. EDT, October 15, 1997 sent the Cassini spacecraft and accompanying Huygens Probe on a historic seven-year journey to the ringed planet.

Image Credit: NASA





Jupiter Eye to Io
Date: 12.01.2000
This image taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Dec. 1, 2000, shows details of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and other features that were not visible in images taken earlier, when Cassini was farther from Jupiter.

The picture is a color composite, with enhanced contrast, taken from a distance of 28.6 million kilometers (17.8 million miles). It has a resolution of 170 kilometers (106 miles) per pixel. Jupiter's closest large moon, Io, is visible at left.

The edges of the Red Spot are cloudier with ammonia haze than the spot's center is. The filamentary structure in the center appears to spiral outward toward the edge. NASA's Galileo spacecraft has previously observed the outer edges of the Red Spot to be rotating rapidly counterclockwise, while the inner portion was rotating weakly in the opposite direction. Whether the same is true now will be answered as Cassini gets closer to Jupiter and interior cloud features become sharper. Cassini will make its closest approach to Jupiter, at a distance of about 10 million kilometers (6 million miles), on Dec. 30, 2000.

The Red Spot region has changed in one notable way over the years: In images from NASA's Voyager and Galileo spacecraft, the area surrounding the Red Spot is dark, indicating relatively cloud-free conditions. Now, some bright white ammonia clouds have filled in the clearings. This appears to be part of a general brightening of Jupiter's cloud features during the past two decades.

Jupiter has four large moons and an array of tiny ones. In this picture, Io is visible. The white and reddish colors on Io's surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials while the black areas are due to silicate rocks. Like the other large moons, Io always keeps the same hemisphere facing Jupiter, called the sub-Jupiter hemisphere. The opposite side, much of which we see here, is the anti-Jupiter hemisphere. Io has more than 100 active volcanoes spewing very hot lava and giant plumes of gas and dust. Its biggest plume, Pele, is near the bottom left edge of Io's disk as seen here.

Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona





Tvashtar Catena, Io
Date: 02.22.2000
An active volcanic eruption on Jupiter's moon Io was captured in this image taken on Feb. 22, 2000 by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Tvashtar Catena, a chain of giant volcanic calderas centered at 60 degrees north, 120 degrees west, was the location of an energetic eruption caught in action in November 1999. A dark, "L"-shaped lava flow to the left of the center in this more recent image marks the location of the November eruption. White and orange areas on the left side of the picture show newly erupted hot lava, seen in this false color image because of infrared emission. The two small bright spots are sites where molten rock is exposed to the surface at the toes of lava flows. The larger orange and yellow ribbon is a cooling lava flow that is more than more than 60 kilometers (37 miles) long. Dark, diffuse deposits surrounding the active lava flows were not there during the November 1999 flyby of Io.

This color mosaic was created by combining images taken in the near-infrared, clear, and violet filters from Galileo's camera. The range of wavelengths is slightly more than that of the human eye. The mosaic has been processed to enhance subtle color variations. The bright orange, yellow, and white areas at the left of the mosaic use images in two more infrared filters to show temperature variations, orange being the coolest and white the hottest material. This picture is about 250 kilometers (about 155 miles) across. North is toward the top and illumination from the Sun is from the west (left).

Image Credit: NASA





10,000 Galaxies
Date: 01.16.2004
Galaxies, galaxies everywhere - as far as NASA's Hubble Space Telescope can see. This view of nearly 10,000 galaxies is the deepest visible-light image of the cosmos. Called the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, this galaxy-studded view represents a "deep" core sample of the universe, cutting across billions of light-years.

The snapshot includes galaxies of various ages, sizes, shapes, and colors. The smallest, reddest galaxies, about 100, may be among the most distant known, existing when the universe was just 800 million years old. The nearest galaxies - the larger, brighter, well-defined spirals and ellipticals - thrived about 1 billion years ago, when the cosmos was 13 billion years old.

In vibrant contrast to the rich harvest of classic spiral and elliptical galaxies, there is a zoo of oddball galaxies littering the field. Some look like toothpicks; others like links on a bracelet. A few appear to be interacting. These oddball galaxies chronicle a period when the universe was younger and more chaotic. Order and structure were just beginning to emerge.

The Ultra Deep Field observations, taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys, represent a narrow, deep view of the cosmos. Peering into the Ultra Deep Field is like looking through an eight-foot-long soda straw.

In ground-based photographs, the patch of sky in which the galaxies reside (just one-tenth the diameter of the full Moon) is largely empty. Located in the constellation Fornax, the region is so empty that only a handful of stars within the Milky Way galaxy can be seen in the image.

In this image, blue and green correspond to colors that can be seen by the human eye, such as hot, young, blue stars and the glow of Sun-like stars in the disks of galaxies. Red represents near-infrared light, which is invisible to the human eye, such as the red glow of dust-enshrouded galaxies.

The image required 800 exposures taken over the course of 400 Hubble orbits around Earth. The total amount of exposure time was 11.3 days, taken between Sept. 24, 2003 and Jan. 16, 2004.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI) and the HUDF Team





Neptune Clouds
Date: 08.25.1989
This Voyager 2 high resolution color image, taken 2 hours before closest approach, provides obvious evidence of vertical relief in Neptune's bright cloud streaks.

These clouds were observed at a latitude of 29 degrees north near Neptune's east terminator. The linear cloud forms are stretched approximately along lines of constant latitude and the Sun is toward the lower left. The bright sides of the clouds which face the Sun are brighter than the surrounding cloud deck because they are more directly exposed to the sun. Shadows can be seen on the side opposite the sun. These shadows are less distinct at short wavelengths (violet filter) and more distinct at long wavelengths (orange filter). This can be understood if the underlying cloud deck on which the shadow is cast is at a relatively great depth, in which case scattering by molecules in the overlying atmosphere will diffuse light into the shadow.

Because molecules scatter blue light much more efficiently than red light, the shadows will be darkest at the longest (reddest) wavelengths, and will appear blue under white light illumination.

The resolution of this image is 11 kilometers (6.8 miles per pixel) and the range is only 157,000 kilometers (98,000 miles). The width of the cloud streaks range from 50 to 200 kilometers (31 to 124 miles), and their shadow widths range from 30 to 50 kilometers (18 to 31 miles). Cloud heights appear to be of the order of 50 kilometers (31 miles).

Image Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory





Planet Mercury
Date: 03.24.1974
Mariner 10's first image of Mercury acquired on March 24, 1974. During its flight, Mariner 10's trajectory brought it behind the lighted hemisphere of Mercury, where this image was taken, in order to acquire important measurements with other instruments.

This picture was acquired from a distance of 3,340,000 miles (5,380,000 km) from the surface of Mercury. The diameter of Mercury (3,031 miles; 4,878 km) is about 1/3 that of Earth.

Images of Mercury were acquired in two steps, an inbound leg (images acquired before passing into Mercury's shadow) and an outbound leg (after exiting from Mercury's shadow). More than 2300 useful images of Mercury were taken, both moderate resolution (3-20 km/pixel) color and high resolution (better than 1 km/pixel) black and white coverage.

Image Credit: NASA

Escrito por Anonymous ^SoNia^ @ 12:04 a. m.

jo que bonito! sabs a lo que me recuerda? a esa noche en la azotea con el telescopio ya sabes de madrid al cielo jaja un beso wapo :P

 
Escrito por Blogger rodivi @ 12:49 p. m.

PiSioSa! :)

A mí también me recuerda bastante a esa noche. ¿Habrá que repetirlo no?

Dentro de poco empezará el buen tiempo y los cielos despejados, así que tenemos una cita pendiente.

Cuídate loca ;)

RoDRi

 
Escrito por Anonymous internet advertising @ 9:18 a. m.

Cool Blog Here! I have a pixel web site If want to promote your web site on my http://www.pixelhurricane.com website the cost is $497.00 for a 100 block of pixels but it will get your site listed in the top of the search engines. internet advertising

 
Escrito por Anonymous list @ 7:58 p. m.

Cool Blog Here! I have a pixel web site If want to promote your web site on my http://www.pixelhurricane.com website the cost is $497.00 for a 100 block of pixels but it will get your site listed in the top of the search engines. list

 
Escrito por Anonymous internet advertising @ 3:46 a. m.

Cool Blog Here! I have a pixel web site If want to promote your web site on my http://www.pixelhurricane.com website the cost is $497.00 for a 100 block of pixels but it will get your site listed in the top of the search engines. internet advertising

 
Escrito por Anonymous Anónimo @ 10:28 p. m.

Great work!
[url=http://kkbmocsw.com/sual/aowd.html]My homepage[/url] | [url=http://rvnmslbt.com/dflr/gpjr.html]Cool site[/url]

 
Escrito por Anonymous Anónimo @ 10:28 p. m.

Thank you!
My homepage | Please visit

 
Escrito por Anonymous Anónimo @ 10:28 p. m.

Thank you!
http://kkbmocsw.com/sual/aowd.html | http://icvudnnt.com/xodb/siyt.html

 
Escrito por Anonymous Anónimo @ 8:38 a. m.

Nice site!
[url=http://yhoqnold.com/owhs/ybtd.html]My homepage[/url] | [url=http://dnsxbgyq.com/spzf/pcli.html]Cool site[/url]

 
Escrito por Anonymous Anónimo @ 8:39 a. m.

Well done!
My homepage | Please visit

 
Escrito por Anonymous Anónimo @ 8:39 a. m.

Thank you!
http://yhoqnold.com/owhs/ybtd.html | http://jebxpoih.com/zlyq/clil.html